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Dsl Modem Failure

#1 User is offline   mjd420nova 

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 07:57 AM

The worst of the worst. Heaven forbid I should have to work on my own stuff but this last failure was the last possible thing that could have failed in the never ending chain of hardware. The Motorola DSL modem took a dive. It was strange at first, dropping the link to the pole. Wouldn't last ten seconds. Then weeks with no problem and it happens again. Then the wind gets really nasty and it drops completely and can't re-establish a link to the pole. An hour later and it pops back up but the wind is still gusting to over 40. The next morning it's down for three hours, from 5 to 8. No trouble when the link is good but gets baulky later and drops again. Not much wind anymore. Works okay the rest of the day. Next morning the link is down and refuses to come back. By ten, full system reset completed and a service call is established. Naturally, when the at&t tech calls, the link has reappeared and working. The tech is two blocks away. He checks the line and finds a short in the service. With a difference of noise from 15 to 85, somethings wacko. I pulled the lines, mounted the boxes, crimpted the connectors so I know there's not a problem there. After a little lighted hearted banter and some questions, the modem is revealed to have entered a terminal state and should have only lasted a year. I got two and half years. Iguess I'm lucky and it was free when I started the service. I bought the $50. Netgear replacement and the next time the link took a dive(the next morning), did a plug and play after using a CAT5 direct to the modem and loaded their disk. Install took maybe thirty minutes and the link popped up immediately. After that, the CAT five goes in the box, and the WIFI router gets put back inline. No problem from there on, completely transparent. I like to see the lights, both modem and router, keeps me more aware of what's happening on my little but important net work. KUDOS to Netgear.

This post has been edited by mjd420nova: 25 March 2012 - 07:59 AM

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#2 User is offline   Rommel 

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 08:51 AM

Yep, that can drive you crazy.
I started with DSL and was happy with the price/service.

Then after a yr and half started to intermittingly loose serious bandwidth. I'm talking dial up speed.
Ran a wire straight from the box in the garage to a new phone port that I laid on my desk for the test.
Same problem, and verizon kept telling me the problem was on my end.
( also changed hardware )

Glad you resolved yours, we never resolved ours.
Verizon said we had to live with it.

I said no I don't. Enter comcast cable.

Now I'm back with verizon being fios entered the neighborhood.

DSL has many connection points along the way and over time become compromised, but I'm telling you nothing new.
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#3 User is offline   crazy4laptops 

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 01:00 PM

Nicely done! I've had a few problems with my DSL service on occasion. I had one modem for about 4 years. No problems with it until lightning struck the phone lines running to the house. How the lines aren't fried to a crisp I will never know. But anyways, ever since that strike, the problems started once I replaced all the fried equipment. Got a new 8port switch and new wifi router and then a few days later, I noticed that the internet would just run great and then stop dead.

I called at&t and said my internet has been been wonky, could a lightning strike have anything to do with it? They replaced the modem for free and bumped up the speed... or the modem auto-upped the speed (idk which) So internet was actually noticeably faster and fun to use! However, the gremlins couldn't stop there... 3 months later, service kept dying with speeds slower than a paralyzed snail. The technician that came had to do 3 trips to hammer out the problem, he found that rain was getting inside the aggregator box for the subdivision and happened to drip right on my phone lines. Thus they had corroded and weren't conducting properly. Once that mess was fixed my service was flawless till my dad switched over to fiber (that was a very very speedy day)
Even the experts started out as beginners
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#4 User is offline   mjd420nova 

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 03:10 PM

I wish that at&t would have offered another piece of junk modem. No, I don't need one with a built in router. It couldn't have been much easier and I didn't have to call anyone to check my setup. Back the first of the year, we have some strange lightning events that has been costing me equipment, one at a time. I have some strong suspicions about what lies between my ground stakes and the water table and if the close proximity to the Hayward Fault has any effect upon creating ground strikes, leading to lightning strikes. Some classify Saint Elmo's fire but that is just a coating of charged particles collecting on super structures. Even the recent CME caused fluctuations in ground potentials and differences over short distances creating loops and whorls. The magnetic field of the planet is very much like the sun but on a much smaller scale. Two desktops took big hits and it blew a tiny fuse between ground sources. Later, a TV, large rear projection type(analog) takes a hit to the vertical deflection logic and went non-linear for all three guns. Then the modem. What's next?? It seems everything has gone off the deep end except for the OLD IBM AT I use for analog level collection for home security and power control. It is behind a UPS that powers it for fours when power fails. Its ground is wrapped with all the rest but seperate from what's brought down from the pole. My station runs on three hot phases and a neutral, not ground. It goes directly to a transformer and the secondaries are grounded, along with the station ground, not the power ground or as it turns out, phone line ground, but that is another can of worms as the phone systems run on 48 volts DC and you use a ground sieze to pick up a line and acheive a dial tone. Lightning does some strange things and as I now know, cause lingering and delayed faults that eventually fail entirely.
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