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TrialPay--Free Stuff With Some Strings

#1 User is offline   PCWorld 

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Posted 17 December 2007 - 01:18 PM

Post your comments for TrialPay--Free Stuff With Some Strings here
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#2 User is offline   mindnova 

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 05:49 AM

Boycotting these sites is the only way to keep from being trapped in expensive and hard to break free member sites.

Time and time again when the word free is ballyed about, things get expensive!!
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#3 User is offline   trialpay 

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 12:23 PM

I am the CEO of TrialPay, and it disappoints me that Yardena did not really do her research here -- several inaccuracies here could have been cleared up by just asking us.
We are a payment method like PayPal. A company like Corel chooses to use us, and lists their price; we do not. The suggestion that we are misleading customers is just wrong.
Yes, a pair of jeans from Guess costs more than Corel Photo Album Deluxe, but that's not the point. If you're not willing to pay for Corel Photo Album Deluxe, but are willing to pay for jeans, this is a way that all parties benefit. If you know you're going to pay, then you shouldn't use TrialPay. To suggest that we are giving consumers a "bad" deal by allowing them to get a product for free when they buy something else -- well, it unfortunately misses the point of what we do and whom we serve.
Thousands of reputable companies use us and we have served millions of happy consumers, and we do not "trap" consumers in any way.
Alex
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#4 User is offline   dwt1966 

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 06:00 PM

I use TrialPay and never had a problem.Thanks Tpay.DWT66
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#5 User is offline   mavigozler 

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 04:45 PM

Exactly what did the PC World editor say that was "suggested" that TrialPay was being "misleading"? Was there any part of her content that was not true at all?

It seemed to me that she only expressed that she preferred to do business another way, and wanted to inform others of her thinking.
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#6 User is offline   LJ56 

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 02:56 AM

Too True. I called an 800, as allowed to call and cancel a trial with Rhapsody. Rep gave me BS that system was down and could not see my account to cancel. So I emailed with notation of call, date/time and company site page stating I could call to cancel and a strongly worded note saying cancel now so I do not incur charges or they would see the start of WW3... they canceled the account within 2 hours. How bout that?!
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#7 User is offline   mindnova 

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 03:35 AM

You create the extra cost and set up situations where it costs way more than the price of the freebee. The consumer has to jump through hoops to get out from under the so called deals.

More to the point I am constantly flooded with spam for these type offers which trialpay may or may not be involved in. You are nothing but a gimmick that is used instead of selling products on with value. More and more companies try to get comsumers hard earned cash with gimmicks instead of providing quality and reasonable prices.
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#8 User is offline   Lunarray3 

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Posted 18 July 2008 - 05:58 PM

I agree with the author of this article with the thought trialpay is not worth exposing yourself to needless aggravation. It reminds me of someone coming to your door selling magazines. You do not know what to expect. I would hope someone goes one step further and looks into these internet downloads advertised as free, that become trialpay only until it is loaded onto your machine. It is misleading and gets you when you really need help. Where is a consumer advocate for us?
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#9 User is offline   sockanasa 

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Posted 16 August 2008 - 08:33 PM

I see both sides of the argument and I think that it comes down to choosing a reputable place to work with and weighing the cost and effort of the "trial" versus the item you get for "free". For me, time is in limited supply and tracking trials and canceling them a month or so later isn't something I want to add to my plate. However, it's name is misleading. Trialplay isn't just trials. Like the company rep said above, it is a checkout method.
For example, I use PocketInformant on my pocketpc since it's interface is much nicer than the standard Microsoft calendar/tasks/contacts/notes. With it, I can see an entire month at a time (with tiny font) which isn't possible with Microsoft's standard calendar. So I wanted to upgrade to the latest version (8.0) when it came out. As the author said, not necessary, but nice. It would cost me $30. I wasn't going to pay that. Instead, I ordered "free" business cards from Vistaprint & paid $5 s/h and got the key for the upgrade within minutes. For me, I spent most of my time trying to figure out if Trialpay was a scam, and with little time or effort "bought" my upgrade for $5. That was worth it. Other offers are not. Every consumer just has to weigh the options and make a decision.
For me, it is equivalent to rebates. I make a decision at purchase if it is worth the effort. It is usually not, but I track my rebates in spreadsheet which tells me when to ping on the rebate house because they are late and over 3 years I've gotten around $4k back. I wouldn't say I've saved that much as rebate items are usually overpriced before rebate, but for me the 15 minutes to fill out the form, copy everything, fill the spreadsheet, and pay ~$0.45 for postage was worth it. In the end 1 only missed about 2% of my total rebate dollars because either the rebate house went bankrupt or I screwed up and tried the same rebate twice.
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#10 User is offline   stasis88 

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Posted 14 November 2008 - 07:25 PM

I tried it last week before seeing this article, I did get the software however I have yet to see how hard it is to get out of the offer...
TrialPay says right on their site that they do not sell your email address, however I used a gmail address I have had for a while but never use. That very night the spam attack started and has not subsided since. I am amazed how much spam I am getting now on there that is not filtered by gmail either. I would recommend people stay away and like the author says I would rather give the money to the creator of the software that I find so useful.
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#11 User is online   turbidite75 

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 09:28 AM

Beware of TrialPay. I know the CEO came on the website and resented allegations against his company. That's a shock! Of course the CEO is going to defend the company. However, I am here to tell you that the spam to my inbox started immediately after I downloaded a free virus software program through TrialPay. I had not signed up for anything else, as I'm careful to sign up for anything the web. Coincidence -- perhaps. But given all the other people who have claimed this issue, I think not.

It is somewhat ironic that the very thing that TrialPay offered me for free has now made me more vulnerable by sending spam directly to my inbox. Naturally I can just delete, but what a pain. I understand nothing comes for free and I made a mistake. Don't do the same as me.
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#12 User is offline   guilartover 

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 12:49 AM

I am a software developer who makes some of the products which most of you people take for granted should be free.

The fact is that around 8000 people are using my program. But when asked to pay 1 (one) dollar for it, how many do you think are willing to pay? Not more than 3%. This is a typical ratio in this industry, its not specific to the quality of my product.

People pay more for washing their car than for software tools they actually use daily. But just ask them to pay and its like "oh, you are spamming, my god, don't you

understand that you're supposed to work for us for FREE?"

Well, trialpay is trying to change all that, and I hope they succeed. If people won't pay one dollar for useful software, but will waste $200 without a blink for yet another pair of sneakers, then I say well done to trialpay for charging you $201 for the sneakers and keeping my software company alive.

By the way, we're gettng close to the end of the era of free software, people will have to understand that you have to pay for software just like you do for shoes.
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#13 User is offline   Marcwolf 

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 11:22 PM

Oh Dear..
Well - I was interested in PC Tool's Anti Virus. I was going to get the free one but they had an offer via Trialpay.
So I looked at what they had to offer and I picked up a subscription for PC World at less than what I would have paided for PC Tools.
Unless of course Yardena thinks that PC World is not worth the money I paid for it.
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#14 User is online   turbidite75 

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 06:44 AM

I absolutely understand the argument that many people do not pay for their software, and how the software developer gets the short end of the stick because so few want to pay. It's not fair, but neither is spam.

You are saying that it is ok to stick the consumer on some spam list, because the consumer is willing to take the program for free from a website. Be it TrialPay, be it whatever. Since the consumer is not willing to pay cash, then the company should get paid by selling the consumer's name to a third-party which sends the consumer dozens of emails for illegitimate schemes? Fine, if the consumer is willing to do such a thing. However, two issues with this argument:

(1) You used the analogy of a car wash. You are driving down the road and see a sign for FREE CAR WASH. You pull over, get the car wash, and then at the end, a donation is asked for. You could drive away without giving one, but you would feel like a jerk. It's all understood that they wash the car, you'll donate some money to their charity. See, you know EXACTLY what is going on. What if instead of taking that donation, they just told you it was out of the goodness of their heart BUT secretly stuck a bumper sticker on the back of your car for a cause you may or may not support. Not the end of the world, you can take the bumper sticker off with a razor blade. Same as spam in your email. You can delete it, or change email accounts. But in neither case is it straight forward.

(2) I followed through with my end of the bargain with TrialPay by subscribing to a music subscription service. There was an assortment of options, subscribing to magazines, music services, etc. I chose one, and in return I got anti-virus software. That was the deal. It was NOT to put my name on the spam list.

All my original intention was CONSUMER BEWARE. I agree that further changes in the industry could very well end the era of free software. But until that does, don't put my name on a spam list without letting me know.
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#15 User is offline   mistyn 

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 12:39 PM

I use trialpay and I have never once got spam or had a hard time to cancel something. One the companys that you go and get a subscription to something or buy something from to get the free product from trialpay is not owned by trialpay so they have nothing to do with how easy or hard it is to cancle something. Or just dont go sign up for anything you are not going to want to keep then you will not have to deal with the hassle of cancleing it. I always sign up for something I really want.
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#16 User is offline   lelu1023 

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Posted 07 May 2010 - 02:50 PM

View Posttrialpay, on 01 January 2008 - 12:23 PM, said:

I am the CEO of TrialPay, and it disappoints me that Yardena did not really do her research here -- several inaccuracies here could have been cleared up by just asking us.
We are a payment method like PayPal. A company like Corel chooses to use us, and lists their price; we do not. The suggestion that we are misleading customers is just wrong.
Yes, a pair of jeans from Guess costs more than Corel Photo Album Deluxe, but that's not the point. If you're not willing to pay for Corel Photo Album Deluxe, but are willing to pay for jeans, this is a way that all parties benefit. If you know you're going to pay, then you shouldn't use TrialPay. To suggest that we are giving consumers a "bad" deal by allowing them to get a product for free when they buy something else -- well, it unfortunately misses the point of what we do and whom we serve.
Thousands of reputable companies use us and we have served millions of happy consumers, and we do not "trap" consumers in any way.
Alex


I'm sure you would be surprised to see how many "trialpay is a ripoff" posts I've found online, following my OWN ripoff from your company. I completed an offer of yours in a game I play on facebook. Followed the directions exactly, and was told by one of your customer service reps, "Nope, you don't get your credit because the other company says you didn't complete the order'. I spent $50 on this offer, and did not receive the game credits I was entitled to. Provided a copy of my email that the offer was in fact completed as requested, and was still told no. I've learned my lesson, agree completely with the author of this article, and will be passing the word on my blog, on the websites I own, and also on the game page at facebook about this. I am NOT the only one who had this problem with this offer, and I absolutely feel screwed over and ripped off. Never again will I complete a trial offer through trialpay.
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#17 User is online   rico001 

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Posted 15 June 2010 - 12:34 PM

View PostPCWorld, on 17 December 2007 - 01:18 PM, said:

Post your comments for TrialPay--Free Stuff With Some Strings here

When I did have problems they help me fix them and were polite - you might have to have 3rd party cookies enabled.
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#18 User is offline   MichaelNgigi 

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  Posted 01 October 2011 - 11:09 AM

cool
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#19 User is offline   lazarous 

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 05:51 PM

View Postguilartover, on 18 June 2009 - 12:49 AM, said:

I am a software developer who makes some of the products which most of you people take for granted should be free.

The fact is that around 8000 people are using my program. But when asked to pay 1 (one) dollar for it, how many do you think are willing to pay? Not more than 3%. This is a typical ratio in this industry, its not specific to the quality of my product.

People pay more for washing their car than for software tools they actually use daily. But just ask them to pay and its like "oh, you are spamming, my god, don't you

understand that you're supposed to work for us for FREE?"

Well, trialpay is trying to change all that, and I hope they succeed. If people won't pay one dollar for useful software, but will waste $200 without a blink for yet another pair of sneakers, then I say well done to trialpay for charging you $201 for the sneakers and keeping my software company alive.

By the way, we're gettng close to the end of the era of free software, people will have to understand that you have to pay for software just like you do for shoes.

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#20 User is offline   lazarous 

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 06:02 PM

I am web developer, who on a limited income, I have had three customers refuse to pay thier invoices, because they
expected thier websites for free.

It absolutely sickens me, that so many people are willing steal from hard working people such as myself. Trialpay
has allowd me to aquire essential software, that I would not have been able to afford otherwise.
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