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Microsoft Prepares for End of Windows With Midori

#1 User is offline   PCWorld 

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 03:30 PM

Post your comments for Microsoft Prepares for End of Windows With Midori here
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#2 User is offline   raife1 

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 08:06 PM

Ooohhh... I cant wait...

...I cant wait to perpetually pay, just, for my computer to keep working.

...I cant wait for (Microsofts long-planned) individual-user-pricing.

...I cant wait until my system is nothing more than a "Microsoft-Services" delivery-device.

...I cannot wait to hand-over, complete control of my property and livelihood... and literally being at the mercy of every communications-company, ISP, backbone-provider, software-provider, or government-agency... which stands between, me, and my ability to securely, privately, and inexpensively, manage my-own affairs.

And I, especially, cant wait until a repeatedly convicted illegal-monopoly holds all the cards, and can literally change my software (which I, absolutely depend upon) virtually, daily... or, can increase the prices I have to pay (at the slightest marketing-whim).


You know... there are already two phrases for this:

1- "Mainframe-Computing"... (which was, intentionally, abandoned for extremely-good reasons).

And...

"Complete Lock-in" and control... (and, you know who is pushing this the hardest).

I dont have a problem with "remote server-applications" (as an additional, data-processing, option). What I DO have a problem with is what this... (Effectively, turning my computer into a DUMB-TERMINAL)... will actually mean to, my, personal- choice, control, privacy, and costs.

I think to understand what Microsoft is actually thinking... you should pay attention to the line,

"They're preparing for the day when people realize we don't need Windows anymore"...


I believe that, that day is actually bearing down on Microsoft (like a runaway freight-train)... and Microsofts (???...altruistic...???) answer..? Eliminate the true "personal Computer", and turn it back into a locked-down, locked-in, perpetual revenue-source (which, just-so happens, strips people of all of those annoying "consumer-rights", freedoms, and choices.

Just, my two-cents...
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#3 User is offline   YukonCornelius 

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Posted 31 July 2008 - 06:14 AM

Yes, Windows must change, as will every OS, including Apple and Linux. However, you are looking at years out, and the process will be gradual. It won't be the shock this article is predicting. In 5+ years, computer operating systems will be very different, as they should be. We can't continue with the same point an click at windows operating systems forever (this would include Linux and MAC OS). And so you know, Midori is currently just a research project at Microsoft. It may or may not see the light of day. Don't believe everything you read in the tabloid tech press.
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#4 User is offline   wwalker 

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Posted 31 July 2008 - 07:55 AM

Raife1,

You say mainframe computing was intentionally abaondoned??

I guess that's why since about the year 2000 the installed mainframe capacity has grown by about 325%.

This growth is not just to handle the year 2000 installed base, but also includes a substantial number of users moving their larger database platform to the mainframe environment.
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#5 User is offline   jazurell 

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Posted 31 July 2008 - 06:17 PM

Another example of MS arrogance. What about the folks who are still using dialup and can't get high speed, or don't use high speed due to retirement? I'll just bet they can't hardly wait to do all their computer work at the speed of dial-up.
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#6 User is offline   raife1 

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Posted 31 July 2008 - 06:53 PM

wwalker said:

>> "You say mainframe computing was intentionally abaondoned (sic)??"


Sorry, that was something of an over-simplification. Sometimes I forget that not everyone is a serious-geek that actually started working with computers in the 70s, and avidly enjoys computer-history.

What I was referring to was the intentional adoption of the "micro-computer" (over the centralized, mainframe-terminal... the so-called, "high-priest" architecture, that existed before the "desktop computer"). This, evolution, was an intentional, and, yes, extremely sought-out goal, that led to the "micro-computer revolution" of the seventies and eighties. Microsoft, very much, rode on the back of that "revolution".

When I am referring to the "abandonment" of the "mainframe", I am actually, specifically, talking-about the purposeful liberation of processing-power, from external central-control, over computers/users. I am certainly not referring to organizations, internally, centralizing, and distributing their data/processing and communications (I.E. using centralized-servers).

However, I stand by my earlier objections to, so-called, "cloud computing" (when it refers to extracting most of the fundamental benefits of "Personal Computers", in favor of a tenuous, perpetual-payment, and loss of individual-control, model... that puts so much third-party control, and reliance, on external-factors (for maintaining basic computer-capabilities).
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#7 User is offline   wwalker 

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 07:04 AM

I completely agree with your position and objections to "cloud computing" as seen in the article. I want my apps on my PC along with my data. My objection was with your statement about how the mainframe was abandoned. In my 35+ years working on them all I've seen is growth in the use of mainframes.

On your "over-simplification". I too have been in the business since the early 70's on IBM big iron and I'm still working on IBM big iron (of course it's now smaller than some of the mini-computers we had in the old days). I never really did anything with the open systems side, but we alway had them for many of our front end processes. However, when the PC came around in the early 80's I was all over that. I had Visicalc, Dbase II, Wordstar and my favorite was the Intel 8080 macro assembler. I found assembler the easiest language because it is my language of choice on the IBM mainframe. The biggest difference I've found in the micro computer vs the mainframe assembler instruction set is the micro seems to be missing the direct storage to storage instructions available on the mainframe (that may have changed on the new micro processors, I haven't written any assembler on a PC since 8086 processors). It didn't bother me at all to have that little 4" green screen on my Osborne I running CP/M doing the 5 1/4 floppy shuffle.
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#8 User is offline   rroberto18 

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 12:03 PM

raife

i couldn't have said it better

thanks
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#9 User is offline   BAMT 

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 03:52 PM

I agree. I also oppose cloud-computing and remote apps because if anything goes wrong remotely you're screwed. Also, traveling with a laptop would be VERY difficult.
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#10 User is offline   stickman 

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Posted 04 August 2008 - 06:05 AM

No good to me if I cannot use it when I am OFFLINE.
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#11 User is offline   cballinger 

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Posted 04 August 2008 - 06:07 AM

Oh, and let's not forget the great thin -client period that was going to solve all our computing problems by making mini-mainframes out of underpowered Servers.

No one seems to consider the business impact when a Hyper or Virtual Server bits the big one and those 10-20 virtual servers that resided on that one physical box are down what it has just done to productivity in your business, or the amount of time and resources it's going to take to get it back up and the sad lack of diagonostic tools most management won't let you spend just in case the servers do crash and you need them to determine the cause.

A system so tightly integrated would also be a system so easily targeted for intrusion and MS has shown repeatedly that their OS environment has never been structured to protect applications or even itself from attach. Would you want your heart monitor, respirator, EKG, pharmacy, etc. hooked up to a system that is hackable from China/Iran/Iraq, etc.?? I think I'd pass on that myself, thanks MS.
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#12 User is offline   derickthegreat 

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Posted 04 August 2008 - 10:17 AM

Hmm, a Virtual operating system? That may end pirating,and many other problems with the windows OS, but now that i hear that microsoft is going virtual, i dont want anything to do with it, looks like the feauture for me holds a world of mac, i think that if windows or midora is virtual it will have alot more plaques then windows, well i dont know alot about vitualazation tech but i would think if everyone is sharing the same programs wouldnt someone be able to upload a virus into the system and be able to implant it into everyones computers? then theres the whole wat if the server holding your stuff goes down for matinence or it has a fire or power outtage, then the world with this computing would be nothing, this would also make it so that people wouldn't want to have the better hardware then there best friend, then theres the gamers, what about us? We need a windows like platform! i think microsoft needs BILL back becasue there going to abandon windows, that was BILL's Legacy! i dont think he would look very highly of what he left! please microsoft stick with windows and convert to a unix way so that it will be easier for everyone!!!!
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#13 User is offline   mrwarrenzhang 

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Posted 04 August 2008 - 10:50 AM

I'm glad microsoft is continuing its tradition of excellence
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#14 User is offline   VHMP01 

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Posted 04 August 2008 - 05:50 PM

I do not get it, everybody is bashing MS OS (Vista) and with this helping others grow into cloud computing, specifically Google. But been in the “give things free” but earn from “selling your personal private information to advertisers” business, they are the main ones pushing cloud computing so that they have all, every single bit of your information controlled. We should think about it twice, and as mentioned before, my private bits under my control on or offline, at my own hardware (with a great and safe OS).

Maybe for business it is good, control what workers can and cannot do with ‘dumb’ terminals connected all the time.
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#15 User is offline   BAMT 

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Posted 06 August 2008 - 04:55 AM

cballinger said:

A system so tightly integrated would also be a system so easily targeted for intrusion and MS has shown repeatedly that their OS environment has never been structured to protect applications or even itself from attach. Would you want your heart monitor, respirator, EKG, pharmacy, etc. hooked up to a system that is hackable from China/Iran/Iraq, etc.?? I think I'd pass on that myself, thanks MS.



Of course they (or anyone) could hack almost any system, they just don't go after home users because it takes to long and there are less benefits. But once they have everything on a non-hardware-firewalled, primary server...
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#16 User is offline   charles849 

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Posted 08 August 2008 - 05:29 AM

I'll be dead by then
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#17 User is offline   Elijah 

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Posted 08 August 2008 - 03:33 PM

I am totally against Cloud Computering. Just think, if the Feds come up to MS and say "We want to see what is on his computer" do you really think that MS won't let them? If all of your programs and files are on the internet, what will stop MS from looking at your files and your data?

Not me.....I value my privacy way to much.

If MS does go to Cloud Coputing, I will go to Linux.
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#18 User is offline   CyberVulcan 

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Posted 09 August 2008 - 01:00 AM

The choice personal computer users are facing is a computer with locally installed software which can save personal data on a local device that is quite stable and easily manageable or we can pay daily for software as a service using application and storing data remotely that is not as safe and depends on how reliable and the availability of an Internet connection. Wow this a tough choice. Why are Microsoft anmong others trying to send us back in time to the days of Mainframes and dumb terminals computers user did not want this setup the first time around why do these companies think we will accept the same setup under a different name. Operating System software must evolve however there is still plently of room for improvement in local desktop operating systems.
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#19 User is offline   k9kapers 

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Posted 11 August 2008 - 07:49 AM

This is all so out there kind of like the computers on Star Trek, one big mainframe, but what about those of us who live in the "boonies" and have no DSL etc? We still have dial up and cannot even get cable where we are. We have only had power for 15 years in our area, and to get satellite is still not dependable... so does that mean we will need to get mac's? Sorry MS but you will give us no choice. I guess we should stock up on spare parts while we can. I do most of my computing off line....and like it that way.
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#20 User is offline   cornfed25701 

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Posted 11 August 2008 - 11:46 AM

I have been trying to work with windows since 98 first came out. I'm now 61 years old and I would like to see windows come with a new OS that was finished. It seems that ever time they cosme out with one you have to addto them for a couple years before its working . Closing hacker holes and ever thing else that seems to be wrong, why now just finish the program before you release it. I don't claim to have all or any of the answers but as much money as they pay the programers they should be getting more for their money.
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