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Why do you need an ISP to connect to the Internet?

#1 User is offline   Raistlin 

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 05:05 AM

(I couldn't find a more appropriate forum for this so I took this one).

Why do you need an ISP to connect to the Internet? If you could just "connect" directly to it, wouldn't it be cheaper?
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#2 User is offline   tek101 

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 05:32 AM

1/ Security .....Security .....Security......

2/ At home ...." Not in a cafe shop "...

3/ Be a Nice neighbor ...: "Don't want to hog...."

Show Us your way ....please.....

Thanks.
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#3 User is offline   Raistlin 

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 06:28 AM

Sorry, didn't get that. :(
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#4 User is offline   mjd420nova 

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 07:38 AM

If you are looking to have an access point to the internet, the first step is through an ISP. If you go to a coffee shop or net cafe, they have a service provider that gives them a route to the internet. Whatever home page you choose on your unit, laptop, notebook or even a net phone, you have to have a first step to a starting page. This might be Yahoo, MSN or even PCW, it really doesn't matter but you need that important portal to establish the first connection. This usually starts with a gateway, which is most often a pole mounted unit that collects all the data streams in that neighborhood into a much larger data stream and converted from either a cable line, DSL line or dial up to a fibre optic line. This would next go to a name server that looks at a small part of the data package to see where it came from and where it wants to go and look it up on an access list to see if it's allowed and in the proper format. This name server is important as it is what gives you the first access permissions. It is operated/owned by an ISP and is required. No way around this step.
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#5 User is offline   Raistlin 

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 07:58 AM

Could you do that (mount the server and everything) all by yourself? Or do you have to depend on a company?
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#6 User is offline   coastie65 

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 11:14 AM

Hey mjd, Your explaination is pretty good, except that in the case of mine and others, the fiber runs all the way to the computer through the router. For the Comcast service, the Fiber is down the street at the cross street, where the connction is, and copper from there to the houses. coastie
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#7 User is offline   mjd420nova 

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 05:46 PM

Yes, you could mount the server yourself, that is, you could own and operate the server yourself but you still need someway to get into the internet and that's through an ISP. Someone has to bring a cable, wire or even provide a satelite dish to give you that all important link. As Coastie says, they are even to the point of bringing the fibreoptics right up to your home but somewhere along the line you have to get to that name server that looks up your user info to give you the permission to access anything beyond that point.
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#8 User is offline   waldojim 

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 07:15 PM

Or you call Quest, Sprint, Windstream, Verizon, etc, get fibre dropped to your house (at $500/mo) and handle everything on your own.

The ISP uses little games on their end to allow them to overfill a particular pipes worth of traffic. That is why they are willing to use a T1 and drop 500 customers 1.5Mbit service... they are banking on you not using your service 24/7 and they have clauses that state they may not provide the full bandwidth.

Trust me, your internet is cheaper through your ISP than getting it directly.

Broadband.com search for a full T1 and you will understand what I mean.
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