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Can I Put Files Onto My Sd Card Via A Camera? please help !

#1 User is offline   odoc 

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Posted 22 October 2009 - 04:24 PM

Can i put files onto my SD card via a camera? When i try to do this, it won't let me drag anything onto it. Is there any way to put files onto an SD card using a camera? Thanks in advance.
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#2 User is offline   smax013 

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Posted 22 October 2009 - 04:30 PM

View Postodoc, on 22 October 2009 - 04:24 PM, said:

Can i put files onto my SD card via a camera? When i try to do this, it won't let me drag anything onto it. Is there any way to put files onto an SD card using a camera? Thanks in advance.


It would certainly depend on the camera. Some camera's require the use of the manufacturer's software to access the memory card and get photos off the camera. More than likely, it would not be possible under such circumstances.

Many cameras will essentially mount a memory card like an external drive. My Canon does this if I recall correctly (I never really use this mode...I just pull the card out and use a card reader). Depending on how such cameras do this, it might be theoretically possible. I have never tried it with my camera.
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#3 User is offline   lexon 

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Posted 23 October 2009 - 04:00 AM

I have no idea how to do this with a camera. I use a eight in one card reader plugged into the USB port of my PC. Very easy that way to transfer files. In fact I have a mini laptop that has a SD card slot for the SD media card that I use in my camera. It fits the PC slot and becomes another flash drive for the PC. SD Media is also called a solid state flash drive. There are different types of Media for PC's and cameras. search the Internet for the terms I have used.

lex
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#4 User is offline   lexon 

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Posted 23 October 2009 - 08:07 AM

View Postlexon, on 23 October 2009 - 04:00 AM, said:

I have no idea how to do this with a camera. I use a eight in one card reader plugged into the USB port of my PC. Very easy that way to transfer files. In fact I have a mini laptop that has a SD card slot for the SD media card that I use in my camera. It fits the PC slot and becomes another flash drive for the PC. SD Media is also called a solid state flash drive. There are different types of Media for PC's and cameras. search the Internet for the terms I have used.

lex

I am guessing at what you want to do. Here is a photo of what I use. I like to download the photos to my PC with this device. That way I do not have to use the software that comes with the camera. A lot easier. You can see two different types of media. The reader takes both at the same time and show up right on the PC desktop. I use a Linux Operating System is the reason the media show up un the desktop. You would have to look in the File Manager when using Windows from what little I remember of Windows. Good luck.

Posted Image

lex
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#5 User is offline   smax013 

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Posted 23 October 2009 - 04:29 PM

The original poster mentioned in another topic (which is now locked) that the camera is a Canon Powershot SD1200IS Digital ELPH. That might help people try to help.

When I get a chance, I will play with my Canon camera to see I can do it at all.
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#6 User is offline   lexon 

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Posted 23 October 2009 - 07:39 PM

View Postsmax013, on 23 October 2009 - 04:29 PM, said:

The original poster mentioned in another topic (which is now locked) that the camera is a Canon Powershot SD1200IS Digital ELPH. That might help people try to help.

When I get a chance, I will play with my Canon camera to see I can do it at all.


I have the Canon PowerShot A590IS and it uses the same media. In the photo I posted, it is the smaller media in the reader. Again. I use a media reader rather than messing with the camera software. Media readers that plug into the USB port can be obtained for about $10.00 with careful shopping. Why load your Windows PC with unnecessary software. Use to do the same when I had a Windows PC. A reader was much easier than messing with the software.

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#7 User is offline   smax013 

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Posted 23 October 2009 - 08:26 PM

View Postlexon, on 23 October 2009 - 07:39 PM, said:



I have the Canon PowerShot A590IS and it uses the same media. In the photo I posted, it is the smaller media in the reader. Again. I use a media reader rather than messing with the camera software. Media readers that plug into the USB port can be obtained for about $10.00 with careful shopping. Why load your Windows PC with unnecessary software. Use to do the same when I had a Windows PC. A reader was much easier than messing with the software.

lex


Many cameras do NOT need "extra" software. My Canon Powershot A610 will mount the memory card as a "disk" just by connecting a USB cable between the camera and the computer and putting the camera in "play" mode. And I was able to actually copy a file to the card just using Windows Explorer just like it was another external drive (it was a JPEG file, but the camera did not recognize it as an "acceptable" JPEG format...and the camera would certainly choke on DOC, PDF, XLS, etc files).

Personally, I, like you, use a card reader, but that does not change the fact that I can directly connect my camera with no additional software needed...as can many/most cameras.
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#8 User is offline   odoc 

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Posted 23 October 2009 - 08:37 PM

Alright, thanks for the replies. Sorry for the double post.
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#9 User is offline   lexon 

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Posted 24 October 2009 - 06:31 AM

View Postsmax013, on 23 October 2009 - 08:26 PM, said:

View Postlexon, on 23 October 2009 - 07:39 PM, said:



I have the Canon PowerShot A590IS and it uses the same media. In the photo I posted, it is the smaller media in the reader. Again. I use a media reader rather than messing with the camera software. Media readers that plug into the USB port can be obtained for about $10.00 with careful shopping. Why load your Windows PC with unnecessary software. Use to do the same when I had a Windows PC. A reader was much easier than messing with the software.

lex


Many cameras do NOT need "extra" software. My Canon Powershot A610 will mount the memory card as a "disk" just by connecting a USB cable between the camera and the computer and putting the camera in "play" mode. And I was able to actually copy a file to the card just using Windows Explorer just like it was another external drive (it was a JPEG file, but the camera did not recognize it as an "acceptable" JPEG format...and the camera would certainly choke on DOC, PDF, XLS, etc files).

Personally, I, like you, use a card reader, but that does not change the fact that I can directly connect my camera with no additional software needed...as can many/most cameras.



Wow, learn something new everyday. I finally found the cable for my Canon camera and plugged it in. I have always preferred the media reader. Works very well with my Linux OS. Yes, files scan be moved back and forth. The only maybe downside is using up the camera batteries. When the OP asked about moving files, I saw no reason for just putting any kind of files on the media other than photos or maybe avi's since the camera can do movies. This is probably in the instructions but being part of the male species on this planet, I often do not read instructions. :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

lex
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#10 User is offline   smax013 

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Posted 24 October 2009 - 01:35 PM

View Postlexon, on 24 October 2009 - 06:31 AM, said:




Wow, learn something new everyday. I finally found the cable for my Canon camera and plugged it in. I have always preferred the media reader. Works very well with my Linux OS. Yes, files scan be moved back and forth. The only maybe downside is using up the camera batteries. When the OP asked about moving files, I saw no reason for just putting any kind of files on the media other than photos or maybe avi's since the camera can do movies. This is probably in the instructions but being part of the male species on this planet, I often do not read instructions. :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

lex


The part is red is precisely why I use card readers instead of the camera most of the time.

As to why to put files on the card, my best guess is just to carry around some files for use with other computers without having to also carry around a flash drive or portable external hard drive. After all, if you are already taking the camera and need to take some Word or Excel file (or whatever), then why carry another device if it will fit on the camera card (and you do not need that extra space for more pictures). The other possibility is to put some pictures back on the camera in the hopes that you could then hook the camera up to a TV to show people the pictures using the camera.
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