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Hdtv Vs. Hd Monitor Does it matter?

#1 User is offline   Rommel 

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Posted 17 January 2010 - 05:50 PM

Hi all.

I am currently using a nice 19" monitor with vga and DVI. Using DVI.

When a monitor says HD, is it really the same as DVI and they are throwing sales terminalogy at you. I am sure HD is better but by how much?

And if you found a great deal on an HDTV, will it perform the same as an HD monitor of the same size?
Comparing the tv to a 2ms monitor.

Thanks,

Rommel
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#2 User is offline   waldojim 

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Posted 17 January 2010 - 06:24 PM

An HD monitor is a display device capable of 1336x768 (720P) or better.
An HDTV is the above display device with a tuner.

"Full HD" is a display device capable of displaying 1920x1080 (1080P). same note about the tuner.

Things to consider:

1. Most numbers on the specs are fictional. Meaning there is no standard measurement for response time, or contrast ratio.

2. Inputs, Most HD Monitors will include DVI and some other connection (HDMI in my case), Most HDTV's include HDMI, and RGB (component input) as well as Coax.

3. Go someplace where you can actually LOOK at the images, side by side, and see how they behave. See if the respond quick enough for you, and have the color you want, and they don't wash out on the edges...
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#3 User is offline   Rommel 

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 11:19 AM

Thanks the info Waldojim.

Sounds like if they deliver what they advertise then eigther one will be fine.

The advantage with the monitor is more options to connect to your pc if something fails like the HDMI.

I was wondering about optical drives.
Does this mean a basic DVD ROM won't take advantage of HD?
1080P ??

Rommel
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#4 User is offline   smax013 

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 07:40 AM

View PostRommel, on 17 January 2010 - 05:50 PM, said:

Hi all.

I am currently using a nice 19" monitor with vga and DVI. Using DVI.

When a monitor says HD, is it really the same as DVI and they are throwing sales terminalogy at you. I am sure HD is better but by how much?


waldojim basically answered your main question.

I will just add that things get a bit messy as things will somewhat depend on whether your are talking about "TV stuff" or "computer stuff". While the two are converging rapidly, there is still some separation between the two.

In general, HD tend to refer to the resolution. When you talk about HD in "TV stuff", you tend to talk about resolution and whether it is interlaced or progressive. For HD in "computer stuff", you tend to just talk about resolution.

So, when you see a computer monitor listed as being able to do "HD", they typically mean it can do 1920x1080 resolution.

DVI and VGA is a connector type, where as HD is a video format/resolution. A VGA, DVI, or HDMI connection can all be capable of running a monitor at an "HD" resolution (i.e. 1920x1080). My 24" monitor is currently displaying at 1920x1200 (and can also do 1920x1080) by way of the VGA connection to my laptop and will do the same resolution if I switch over to the DVI connection with is connected to my desktop.

Quote

And if you found a great deal on an HDTV, will it perform the same as an HD monitor of the same size?
Comparing the tv to a 2ms monitor.

Thanks,

Rommel


Potentially.

It will really depend on the specifications of the monitor and HDTV, but assuming you can find a computer monitor and HDTV with similar specs, then in theory yes.

The issue is that most HDTVs under 30" are generally only 720p monitors. Thus, it is possible that they may not be capable of displaying a true resolution of 1920x1080. OTOH, generally speaking, all 24" and up monitors can do 1920x1080/1200 (or potentially higher) resolutions.
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#5 User is offline   smax013 

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 07:43 AM

View PostRommel, on 19 January 2010 - 11:19 AM, said:

Thanks the info Waldojim.

Sounds like if they deliver what they advertise then eigther one will be fine.

The advantage with the monitor is more options to connect to your pc if something fails like the HDMI.

I was wondering about optical drives.
Does this mean a basic DVD ROM won't take advantage of HD?
1080P ??

Rommel


Yes and no.

If you mean using the DVD drive to play DVD discs that are DVD-Video discs, then basically no.

If you mean using the DVD drive to play a DVD disc that is a DVD-data disc such that you are playing/accessing a computer video file (in other words, you have a HD computer video file that is just stored on a DVD data disc), then yes.
Good riddance PCWorld.
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#6 User is offline   Rommel 

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 11:06 AM

Thank you men.

Rommel
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