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Automatic Backup To Another Computer

#1 User is offline   WNCDude 

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Posted 20 May 2011 - 06:00 AM

Is it possible to automatically backup one computer to another? I am contemplating getting a Mac, but have some programs and hardware that will not work there. Specifically, I have a Fujitsu ScanSnap scanner, that is PC only. What I would like to do is backup the data on the Mac. This would keep all my stuff in one place and I could protect it all with one Carbonite account.
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#2 User is offline   smax013 

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Posted 20 May 2011 - 07:50 PM

View PostWNCDude, on 20 May 2011 - 06:00 AM, said:

Is it possible to automatically backup one computer to another? I am contemplating getting a Mac, but have some programs and hardware that will not work there. Specifically, I have a Fujitsu ScanSnap scanner, that is PC only. What I would like to do is backup the data on the Mac. This would keep all my stuff in one place and I could protect it all with one Carbonite account.


The short answer is yes.

The longer answer is that there are a number of ways to do what it seems like you are wanting to do.

The easiest and most straightforward way would likely be to turn on file sharing on the computers and then save all files to the one computer. You would need to select which computer you want to do this on. You then share the folder that you want to save all files to on that computer. Then on BOTH computers, you just remember to save all files to that folder...on one computer it will be a "local" folder and on the other it will be a "shared" folder across the network. Essentially, for one computer you will not save ANY data files to that computer's hard drive...you will save all files to the other computer as if it was a computer server or NAS drive.

So, for example, since it appears that you currently have the Windows computer and it seems like you currently use Carbonite to backup that computer. If so, when you get the new Mac, you setup the Windows computer to share across the network whatever folder(s) you have Carbonite set to backup. You then connect to that shared folder(s) on the Mac as a network drive and when you save files on the Mac, you save them to the network drive, which is the folder(s) on the PC.

The only problem with this scenario is if you are NOT connected to the network when you use the Mac, then you will not be able to save to the shared folder. In other words, you would have to save the files under those circumstances to the local hard drive and copy the files over later when you are back on the network. If you are going to get a desktop Mac, then this should never be an issue. If you are going to get a laptop Mac and pretty much only use it at home, then it should hardly ever be an issue.

If one computer is a desktop and one a laptop, then you could setup the laptop as the one that shares the folder (i.e. everything is stored on the laptop). The problem with going this route is that ALL your files will be on the computer that is the most susceptible to being stolen (i.e. the computer that you potentially care around you while you travel).

The other issue with this overall scenario is that what ever computer you use as the "network drive" has to stay on when ever you are using the other computer. Depending on how you use your computers, this may not be a big issue.

The other approach would be to use some sort of syncing software that will sync data between the two computers. You would still need to setup folder sharing, but rather than actively saving files across the network, you would still save them locally on both computers and then have the sync software sync the files between the two so that the same files are on both computers.

The variation for both scenarios would be to get a NAS drive. For the first option, you would setup Carbonite to backup the NAS drive (assuming that Carbontie will backup network drives). For the second option, you would then need sync software that syncs data between the computer and the NAS for BOTH computers.
Good riddance PCWorld.
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#3 User is offline   smax013 

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Posted 20 May 2011 - 08:32 PM

You could also try another backup service.

I came across this:

http://www.nextadvis...-and-sugarsync/

It would appear that SugarSync can backup multiple computers AND keep the files synced between those computers. Thus, you might want to consider it.
Good riddance PCWorld.
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#4 User is offline   Flashorn 

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Posted 21 May 2011 - 03:29 PM

How about a Cloud based account to sync your files?

http://www.dropbox.com/

Just a suggestion.



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#5 User is offline   PennsyNut 

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 08:41 AM

Being a novice, can someone explain to me some of the following? Cloud? is this over the Internet? Sync - whatare we syncronizing? Connected to the Network - is this being online? Or is network something I have to do to both my PC's before this all will work? Setting up files on each PC, do they need to both be online? Or simply both "on"? So that when I save something on my main PC which is online, but the second/backup PC is Not online, but "on"? I read this latest article on how to set up files on both PC's, but"how does the data actually get transferred? Obviously not through the air, and not through the Internet What if both are offline? I'm confused. Help. Ask me anything to help me. Main: Dell with Vista. Backup, homemade with XP.

This post has been edited by PennsyNut: 27 June 2011 - 08:48 AM

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#6 User is offline   smax013 

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 01:46 AM

View PostPennsyNut, on 27 June 2011 - 08:41 AM, said:

Being a novice, can someone explain to me some of the following? Cloud? is this over the Internet? Sync - whatare we syncronizing? Connected to the Network - is this being online? Or is network something I have to do to both my PC's before this all will work? Setting up files on each PC, do they need to both be online? Or simply both "on"? So that when I save something on my main PC which is online, but the second/backup PC is Not online, but "on"? I read this latest article on how to set up files on both PC's, but"how does the data actually get transferred? Obviously not through the air, and not through the Internet What if both are offline? I'm confused. Help. Ask me anything to help me. Main: Dell with Vista. Backup, homemade with XP.


As noted, you really should create your own thread for your questions.

Regardless...

"Cloud" means that you are storing and/or syncing your data on some remote server that you connect to by way of the Internet. So, if the computer is not connected to the Internet, then "cloud" services are a complete waste and useless (which is a big reason why I don't really buy the cloud concept in general...depending on the type of the "cloud" service, you could be completely hosed if your Internet connection goes down).

Different "cloud" services function differently. Some are basically just "network storage" (i.e. you store the data on the remote server and have to use an Internet connection anytime you want to get to your data). Some are setup to basically "sync" a copy of your data to the remote server (i.e. you have a local copy that is on your computer and it will get synced to the remote server. The basic idea is that you can access your data from anywhere.

What data gets "synced" will depend on the "cloud" service and/or how you setup the "cloud" service. In the case of Dropbox that Flashorn mentioned, it is basically an online storage service that includes an application to "sync" the online storage with some local storage. You then decide which files you want synced to the online storage. Other services are designed for specific stuff...for example, Amazon has their MP3 "cloud" service...so it will only deal with music files if I recall correctly.

Now, depending on what you want to accomplish, you might not need a "cloud" service. If you just have two local computers that you want to have access the same data, then there are other options besides "cloud" services. They will still tend to require that both computers be connected to a local network...unless you want to be walking a drive between the two computers. So, if you really want to set something up, you really should create your own topic and ask how to do what you want to do...just be specific on what you want to accomplish.
Good riddance PCWorld.
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