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3d Tv

#1 User is offline   dhiren11 

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 02:51 AM

Real flexibility in 3D TVs? I am planning to buy a 3D TV but I would like to know can we (a family of 6) watch it with flexibility from any angle without affecting the quality of movie?

This post has been edited by bcappel: 09 August 2012 - 03:14 PM

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#2 User is offline   LincolnSpector 

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 08:49 AM

View Postdhiren11, on 09 August 2012 - 02:51 AM, said:

Real flexibility in 3D TVs? I am planning to buy a LG 3D TV but I would like to know can we (a family of 6) watch it with flexibility from any angle without affecting the quality of movie?

Hi, dhiren11, and welcome to the forums.

Whether or not you have viewing angle problems depends on the TV you buy (not just the brand name) and how fickle you are about these things.

LCD televisions (and LED TVs, which are really LCD) have a viewing angle problem. As you move farther from a dead-center viewing angle, the picture gets darker and the color duller.

However, there have been huge advances in this technology over the years, and viewing angle isn't the big problem that it used to be. In most sets, you have to get to a very extreme angle, so that you're almost looking at the side of the TV, to notice a real problem. I recently reviewed the LG 55LM6700, and noted some darkening when I looked at it from an extreme angle. But then, looking at the TV from that angle isn't optimal anyway, because of the inevitable distortion.

If you're really worried about this, buy a plasma set. They don't have this problem.

Lincoln


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#3 User is offline   Julian789 

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 05:35 PM

View PostLincolnSpector, on 09 August 2012 - 08:49 AM, said:

View Postdhiren11, on 09 August 2012 - 02:51 AM, said:

Real flexibility in 3D TVs? I am planning to buy a LG 3D TV but I would like to know can we (a family of 6) watch it with flexibility from any angle without affecting the quality of movie?

Hi, dhiren11, and welcome to the forums.

Whether or not you have viewing angle problems depends on the TV you buy (not just the brand name) and how fickle you are about these things.

LCD televisions (and LED TVs, which are really LCD) have a viewing angle problem. As you move farther from a dead-center viewing angle, the picture gets darker and the color duller.

However, there have been huge advances in this technology over the years, and viewing angle isn't the big problem that it used to be. In most sets, you have to get to a very extreme angle, so that you're almost looking at the side of the TV, to notice a real problem. I recently reviewed the LG 55LM6700, and noted some darkening when I looked at it from an extreme angle. But then, looking at the TV from that angle isn't optimal anyway, because of the inevitable distortion.

If you're really worried about this, buy a plasma set. They don't have this problem.

Lincoln


I have a LG Google TV which has basically the same 3D feature as LM6700. I checked the 3D viewing angle very carefully at the store before buying it because I knew all my friends would come over from time to time for movie nights. The sales person told me that passive 3D TVs have a wider viewing angle horizontally and active ones have a wider viewing angle vertically. I don't think vertical viewing angle would be a matter so it was a no brainer to choose a LG 3D TV. I haven't noticed any darkening from the side yet. I wonder how extreme you went during the test and if it matters when watching TV.
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