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Windows7 32bit Or 64bit Whats the deferents?

#1 User is offline   Ericuse165 

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 12:19 PM

Whats the deferents of Windows7 32bit and Windows7 64bit? Is one better then the other? I know you need a 64bit pc to run Windows7 64bit and I know 32bit only can have 3gb or ram and 64bit 8gb. Is that the only deferents??
I have a small business where we fix and set up computers and networks for home users and businesses. I have Certifications in Information Technology and CNSS. My business just got certified with Microsoft and Apple. I have six partners that work with me and make us who we are where we say "Yes we can fix that and it is not fixed until it's Mlyo pc fixed".


If you would like to know more about me or my company feel free to send me a message and I will be more then happy to talk with you.



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#2 User is offline   crazy4laptops 

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 01:29 PM

View PostEricuse165, on 26 September 2010 - 12:19 PM, said:

Whats the difference of Windows7 32bit and Windows7 64bit? Is one better then the other? I know you need a 64bit pc to run Windows7 64bit and I know 32bit only can have 3gb or ram and 64bit 8gb. Is that the only difference??


To put it simply, you need a processor by Intel or AMD that can run the 64-bit instruction set, thus giving you x64

Intel- EM64T
AMD- AMD-64

see if your processor can handle it with CpuID- http://www.cpuid.com/ (the website is not typoed, read it carefully, it does not goto cupid.com)

There is no operational/visual difference between the 32 & 64-bit

And 64-bit can use a whole lot more ram than 8GB, it's 192 GB for Win7 pro and a total of 2TB before the address space is reached 2TB = 2000GB

I personally would recommend x64 if your computer can handle it, because your computer will run faster.

Hopes this helps
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#3 User is offline   Ericuse165 

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 02:09 PM

I have a AMD Turion™ II Dual-Core Processor it says it can support 64bit my pc max memory is 8gb.
I have a small business where we fix and set up computers and networks for home users and businesses. I have Certifications in Information Technology and CNSS. My business just got certified with Microsoft and Apple. I have six partners that work with me and make us who we are where we say "Yes we can fix that and it is not fixed until it's Mlyo pc fixed".


If you would like to know more about me or my company feel free to send me a message and I will be more then happy to talk with you.



Erik
Mylo Corp

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  • Sony VAIO E Series laptop
  • Intel Core i5-2450M Dual Core Processor 3MB
  • 2.50Ghz with Intel Turbo Boost Technalogy up to 3.10Ghz
  • Intel HD Graphics 300
  • 8GB DDR3 1333Mhz
  • 240GB Samsung Solid State disk drive
  • Windows8 64bit









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#4 User is offline   crazy4laptops 

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 02:39 PM

[quote name='Ericuse165' timestamp='1285538950' post='406875']
I have a AMD Turion™ II Dual-Core Processor it says it can support 64bit my pc max memory is 8gb.
[/quote

Turion answers that question ;)

By all means go for Win7 x64, it'll be a speedy experience

Most home users won't need more than 4gb, what do you plan on doing with your laptop?

If you're doing alot of heavy-duty processing like gaming, photoshop, folding@home, calculating PI to the trillionth digit (i'm kidding) the Turion processor can get a bit hot, so keep your laptop well ventilated.

If you're surfing the web on the couch, you have no worries.

Enjoy the speed of Windows 7!
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#5 User is offline   Ericuse165 

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 09:17 PM

Is that a really good Processor all I am going to use it for is internet email chat not into gaming or photos or movies.
I have a small business where we fix and set up computers and networks for home users and businesses. I have Certifications in Information Technology and CNSS. My business just got certified with Microsoft and Apple. I have six partners that work with me and make us who we are where we say "Yes we can fix that and it is not fixed until it's Mlyo pc fixed".


If you would like to know more about me or my company feel free to send me a message and I will be more then happy to talk with you.



Erik
Mylo Corp

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • Sony VAIO E Series laptop
  • Intel Core i5-2450M Dual Core Processor 3MB
  • 2.50Ghz with Intel Turbo Boost Technalogy up to 3.10Ghz
  • Intel HD Graphics 300
  • 8GB DDR3 1333Mhz
  • 240GB Samsung Solid State disk drive
  • Windows8 64bit









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#6 User is offline   crazy4laptops 

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 04:27 AM

View PostEricuse165, on 26 September 2010 - 09:17 PM, said:

Is that a really good Processor all I am going to use it for is internet email chat not into gaming or photos or movies.


Have no worries, internet, email, and chat fall under the energy efficient part of the processor.

Turion is very powerful and it has fun running windows 7, I use my Turion based laptop for gaming and photoshop.
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#7 User is offline   LincolnSpector 

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 06:33 AM

View PostEricuse165, on 26 September 2010 - 12:19 PM, said:

Whats the deferents of Windows7 32bit and Windows7 64bit? Is one better then the other? I know you need a 64bit pc to run Windows7 64bit and I know 32bit only can have 3gb or ram and 64bit 8gb. Is that the only deferents??


Hi, Ericuse.

As Crazy has already explained, you need a 64bit processor to run the 64bit version of Windows 7. You can run the 32-bit version in either 32-bit or 64-bit PCs.

The advantages of 64-bit Windows: You can use more RAM--over 4GB, which will result in speedier performance. And in theory, 64-bit applications run faster than their 32-bit equivalents. I say "in theory," because there are very few 64-bit applications out there. Microsoft Office 2010 comes in 32- and 64-bit versions, both on the same DVD, but Microsoft recommends you install the 32-bit version even on a 64-bit PC. There are quite a few 64-bit utilities, however, but the only advantage they have over 32-bit versions is that they work in 64-bit Windows. Which brings us to:

The disadvantages of 64-bit Windows: Some 32-bit programs won't work in 64-bit Windows, usually utilities that work close to the OS's core or that must integrate with a program that comes with Windows. For instance, a program that inserts itself into Windows Explorer's context menu. Also, no 16-bit Windows programs (those written to work in pre-Win95 versions) will work in x64.

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#8 User is offline   rgreen4 

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 07:35 AM

In addition, some older programs written in the early days of XP contained old modules written for 16bit and were not updated. Some applications written for XP, although 32bit, will not run in either Vista or Win7 32bit because of the program structure not in compliance with the Microsoft standards set out years before XP came out. (games and some graphics programs were the worst offenders).

In Windows 64bit you have two program file folders. Program files for the 64bit applications and modules and Program files (x86) for the 32bit applications and modules. Microsoft Office shows up in both on mine. Having gone for XP to Vista 32bit to Win7 64bit, I would not go back to 32bit in Windows 7 unless absolutely necessary. I help a young friend set up his computer and we started with Win7 64bit when the release candidate was out and everything except his smart phone synch program worked. He has to run 32bit Win7 to run that application to sync his phone to Outlook.

If you are upgrading, I would do a clean install and start with the 64bit disc. If you encounter something that you absolutely need but will not run in 64bit, then redo the clean install with the 32bit disc. FWIW, I never upgrade over a prior install. I always use a second disc newly formatted so while I am in the process of installing the OS and reinstalling the apps (a clean install is very helpful as I only install what I need when I need it and some apps never get reinstalled), I can go back to the old OS. In fact, once you have the new OS installed (with the disc with the old OS disconnected) you can then reconnect the cables to the old drive and use the BIOS to select which drive to boot from. You will find yourself slowly transitioning to the new OS over time. (This machine still has Vista as well as XP on it, primarily to answer questions).
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#9 User is offline   Ericuse165 

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 02:17 PM

I had a pc that was 32bit I just bought a pc that is a 64bit and comes with Win7 64bit. So I will use that but I bought a Win7 32bit cd for my old pc can I install that on a 64bit?
I have a small business where we fix and set up computers and networks for home users and businesses. I have Certifications in Information Technology and CNSS. My business just got certified with Microsoft and Apple. I have six partners that work with me and make us who we are where we say "Yes we can fix that and it is not fixed until it's Mlyo pc fixed".


If you would like to know more about me or my company feel free to send me a message and I will be more then happy to talk with you.



Erik
Mylo Corp

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • Sony VAIO E Series laptop
  • Intel Core i5-2450M Dual Core Processor 3MB
  • 2.50Ghz with Intel Turbo Boost Technalogy up to 3.10Ghz
  • Intel HD Graphics 300
  • 8GB DDR3 1333Mhz
  • 240GB Samsung Solid State disk drive
  • Windows8 64bit









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#10 User is offline   rgreen4 

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 04:28 PM

Yes, you can install a 32bit version of Windows on a 64bit PC. Manufacturers have been doing that for years as they have been waiting for software and drivers to catch up.
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#11 User is offline   DrejXArmy 

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Posted 18 October 2010 - 10:46 AM

For the most part, 64-bit has been pretty much explained. Even though some may point out that 32-bit Windows can actually only use 3.5 GB of the 4 GB installed, so its actually better to have a 64-bit Windows to make sure all 4 GB are being used. And for most users, you will only need 4 GB of RAM for your PC. For the past 2 years, I have been doing alot of beta testing on Windows 7 64-bit systems and I never came across a regular application that would use more then 4 GB of RAM. Now graphic designers, photo/movie editors, and AutoCAD people will need more RAM, gamers actually don't. I only had 1 game that would actually use more then 4 GB of RAM and after further troubleshooting, found it was a fault in the game itself, it really only need about 3 GB. One of the key hardware features missed is the graphics card, which most $100 cards come with standard 1 GB of DDR5 RAM and thats where most of the processes happen for games. The other main piece would be the processor, most internet/school/word processing users will do fine with a Dual Core, if you plan to game or do more intense applications, then getting a Quad Core would be best.

If you plan on using your computer for 2 years or more, best bet will be to go with Windows 7 64-bit, Quad Core Processor, 4 GB of DDR3 RAM, a 1 GB DDR5 Graphics card and 1 TB hard drive. This setup will run you a few hundred dollars, not thousands, last for 2 years, and be easily upgradeable for another 2 plus years. Now the life of the PC depends on your knowledge of how to properly take care of a it, the type of hardware you buy, and who you goto for service.

Oh and don't let sellers fool you with pricing on Windows 7, I have a brand new Windows 7 PRO sitting here and it comes with 32-bit and 64-bit DISC, but only 1 product key. Make sure to verify what your getting and that the seller is legit. I already ran across guys selling copied Windows 7 with a illegal product key. Go here to report and stay updated, http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/ Now wholesale copies like, Tigerdirect and Newegg, do sell indivdual Keys with the respected bit version, but when you compare, the 32 and the 64 bit are the same price, just made to be sold individually. If you goto Bestbuy, or other equal, you should see the box that says has the 32 and 64 bit DISC enclosed.
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#12 User is offline   rgreen4 

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Posted 19 October 2010 - 04:45 AM

View PostDrejXArmy, on 18 October 2010 - 10:46 AM, said:


Oh and don't let sellers fool you with pricing on Windows 7, I have a brand new Windows 7 PRO sitting here and it comes with 32-bit and 64-bit DISC, but only 1 product key. Make sure to verify what your getting and that the seller is legit. I already ran across guys selling copied Windows 7 with a illegal product key. Go here to report and stay updated, http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/ Now wholesale copies like, Tigerdirect and Newegg, do sell indivdual Keys with the respected bit version, but when you compare, the 32 and the 64 bit are the same price, just made to be sold individually. If you goto Bestbuy, or other equal, you should see the box that says has the 32 and 64 bit DISC enclosed.


For point of clarification. Newegg and Tiger Direct sell the OEM version of Windows 7 which is either 32bit or 64bit but not both. This typically runs around $100 for Home Premium. This edition is to be installed by builders of PC's for distribution to someone else (not the builder's own use) and the builder by the license is obligated to provide service. Microsoft will ask for the second group of numbers in the product key on the System Info screen and if it says "OEM" (as these versions will) then they will refer you to the builder/manufacturer of the machine.

The upgrade package which is currently running around $110 for the Home Premium version at Newegg contains both 32bit and 64bit discs and is intended for installation on a PC that had a prior version of Windows installed. It is not intended for new installations. A custom install can be done with this package on a clean hard drive without re-installing the previous Windows version on the drive first.

The full retail package of Home Premum is $177 at Newegg and also containg both 64bit and 32bit discs. It is legal to install on any PC and also has Microsoft support. It can also be moved to a new machine should something happen to your current one (the OEM version cannot be moved).
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#13 User is offline   LiveBrianD 

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Posted 19 October 2010 - 03:54 PM

View Postrgreen4, on 19 October 2010 - 04:45 AM, said:


For point of clarification. Newegg and Tiger Direct sell the OEM version of Windows 7 which is either 32bit or 64bit but not both. This typically runs around $100 for Home Premium. This edition is to be installed by builders of PC's for distribution to someone else (not the builder's own use) and the builder by the license is obligated to provide service.


But according to the EULA, are you allowed to buy an OEM copy of Windows and install it on your own self-built PC? If not, that means I've violated the eula, I bought an OEM copy of Windows 7 for my PC.
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#14 User is offline   rgreen4 

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Posted 21 October 2010 - 08:08 AM

View PostLiveBrianD, on 19 October 2010 - 03:54 PM, said:

But according to the EULA, are you allowed to buy an OEM copy of Windows and install it on your own self-built PC? If not, that means I've violated the eula, I bought an OEM copy of Windows 7 for my PC.


Technically - No. This was pointed out last year by a MS representative and there was a discussion about it. I think we all assumed that we could buy the OEM and it was OK to install on our own PC's and keep them.

Reading line one -

Quote

Each individual software license inside this package may ONLY be distributed with a fully assembled computer system.


Then on the back in very fine print:

Quote

1. Definitions
b. "Distribution" and "distribute" mean the point in time when a Customer System leaves your control.


Unless one is over the top, I doubt they will come knocking on your door (or mine) anytime soon. I guess we could install the full version of XP and then a day later install the upgrade version of Windows 7 (custom install of course) and be totally in compliance with the EULA and for only $10 more.

We should, however, avoid promoting doing that. I have since the legalize was pointed out to me. Of course, I have not built a system since, so I have not had a problem. It activates just fine though.

This post has been edited by rgreen4: 21 October 2010 - 08:10 AM

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#15 User is offline   Kilme 

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Posted 21 October 2010 - 12:08 PM

View Postrgreen4, on 21 October 2010 - 08:08 AM, said:

View PostLiveBrianD, on 19 October 2010 - 03:54 PM, said:

But according to the EULA, are you allowed to buy an OEM copy of Windows and install it on your own self-built PC? If not, that means I've violated the eula, I bought an OEM copy of Windows 7 for my PC.


Technically - No. This was pointed out last year by a MS representative and there was a discussion about it. I think we all assumed that we could buy the OEM and it was OK to install on our own PC's and keep them.

Reading line one -

Quote

Each individual software license inside this package may ONLY be distributed with a fully assembled computer system.


Then on the back in very fine print:

Quote

1. Definitions
b. "Distribution" and "distribute" mean the point in time when a Customer System leaves your control.


Unless one is over the top, I doubt they will come knocking on your door (or mine) anytime soon. I guess we could install the full version of XP and then a day later install the upgrade version of Windows 7 (custom install of course) and be totally in compliance with the EULA and for only $10 more.

We should, however, avoid promoting doing that. I have since the legalize was pointed out to me. Of course, I have not built a system since, so I have not had a problem. It activates just fine though.


That's some interesting info. I've only ever owned 1 retail copy: Windows XP Pro. Since then, I've had XP Pro 32 + 64, Vista Business 32 + 64, and 7 Pro 32 + 64. All of these were free through my college (can only get one copy of each, hence going for 32/64 for extra copies), and all of them have been OEM. I don't know if there's some sort of loophole that allows students to use the OEM copies this way, but still, I highly doubt Microsoft would anything about it.
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#16 User is offline   LiveBrianD 

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Posted 21 October 2010 - 03:39 PM

View Postrgreen4, on 21 October 2010 - 08:08 AM, said:

View PostLiveBrianD, on 19 October 2010 - 03:54 PM, said:

But according to the EULA, are you allowed to buy an OEM copy of Windows and install it on your own self-built PC? If not, that means I've violated the eula, I bought an OEM copy of Windows 7 for my PC.


Technically - No. This was pointed out last year by a MS representative and there was a discussion about it. I think we all assumed that we could buy the OEM and it was OK to install on our own PC's and keep them.

Reading line one -

Quote

Each individual software license inside this package may ONLY be distributed with a fully assembled computer system.


Then on the back in very fine print:

Quote

1. Definitions
b. "Distribution" and "distribute" mean the point in time when a Customer System leaves your control.


Unless one is over the top, I doubt they will come knocking on your door (or mine) anytime soon. I guess we could install the full version of XP and then a day later install the upgrade version of Windows 7 (custom install of course) and be totally in compliance with the EULA and for only $10 more.

We should, however, avoid promoting doing that. I have since the legalize was pointed out to me. Of course, I have not built a system since, so I have not had a problem. It activates just fine though.


Yeah but how does it matter if I keep the system for myself or give it to someone else? I can provide support for my own computers!
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#17 User is offline   rgreen4 

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Posted 21 October 2010 - 09:17 PM

You expect the legalize in a EULA to be logical?

I remember the first OEM package I bought was Office 2000 and the requirement was that you had to buy it with computer parts. Even a CD-ROM counted. Now you can order an OEM copy of Win 7 by itself and no one raises an issue. It's kinda like the "Custom" install in the upgrade package. With Vista, you had to install it once without the access key, and then "upgrade" and this time entering the key. Ironically install an upgrade of Vista twice on a new drive took less time than installing XP even once.

Now with Win 7 you install it once and you are done.
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#18 User is offline   LiveBrianD 

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Posted 23 October 2010 - 11:49 AM

View Postrgreen4, on 21 October 2010 - 09:17 PM, said:

Ironically install an upgrade of Vista twice on a new drive took less time than installing XP even once.


Well I installed Windows 7 on an old PC yesterday (Dell Dimension 8200, Intel P4 2.8GHz, 768MB RDRAM, 80GB HDD, Nvidia geforce2 mx400 64MB graphics), and the install took only 1/2 an hour. However, the PC was REALLY slow under 7. It took maybe 45 minutes to install XP, then another 1.5 hours to load SP2 and SP3, but XP had fairly good performance. I recall they changed how the install extracted files with Vista, and kept that with 7.

View Postrgreen4, on 21 October 2010 - 09:17 PM, said:

You expect the legalize in a EULA to be logical?



You should see the "Pearls Before Swine" comic for today then! :D
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This post has been edited by LiveBrianD: 23 October 2010 - 11:52 AM

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#19 User is offline   shiprock520 

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Posted 27 October 2010 - 10:34 AM

I still have Word 2000 that I last used on Vista. Will this work on my new forthcoming Windows 7 as I'm wanting to transfer a few documents over to it. when it comes.
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#20 User is offline   rgreen4 

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Posted 27 October 2010 - 01:02 PM

It should install without a problem. Many still use it.
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